Making Sense of the Americas

33, Eigene und fremde Welten
How Protest Related to America in the 1980s and Beyond
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Eigene und Fremde Welten
Herausgegeben von Jörg Baberowski, Stefan Rinke und Michael Wildt

Ob "Sonne statt Reagan" auf der Friedensdemo oder Che-Guevara-Poster und Kaffee aus dem revolutionären Nicaragua in der WG-Küche - die Protestkulturen im Westeuropa der 1980er Jahre speisten sich zu einem Großteil aus der spannungsreichen Auseinandersetzung mit Amerika. Die von ihnen betriebene Sinnstiftung ist also ohne die Bezüge und Referenzen, die Wechselwirkungen und Verflechtungen im "transatlantischen Dreieck" zwischen den beiden Teilen des amerikanischen Kontinents und Europa nicht zu verstehen.
Eigene und Fremde WeltenHerausgegeben von Jörg Baberowski, Stefan Rinke und Michael Wildt
Contents



Acknowledgments 9



I. Foundations



Transatlantic Flows and Complex Entanglements of Protest in the 1980s. Introduction 13 (Jan Hansen, Christian Helm, Frank Reichherzer)



Views from the South - Latin American Roots of Anti-Imperialism and Anti-Yankeeism 31 (Christine Hatzky)





II. Looking Northward

"European women push for awareness" - Images, Construals and Activities 5 (Anne Bieschke)



"one world - one struggle - one enemy": The Occupation of the Amerikahaus in West-Berlin, 1980 (Vojin SaSa Vukadinovi?)



"Pacifism does not ensure Peace" -Explaining the Low Profile of the French Pacifist Movement 89 (Ilaria Parisi)



The Italian Communists' Protest against US Foreign Policy - from Nixon to Reagan 109 (Valentine Lomellini)





III. Looking Southward



The Swedish-Chilean Society - Fascist Solidarity with Pinochet's Chile in Sweden 131 (Fernando Camacho Padilla)



Globalizing Nicaragua? An Entangled History of Sandinista Solidarity Movements in Western Europe 151(Kim Christiaens)



Between Solidarity and Emancipation? Female Solidarity and Nicaraguan Revolutionary Feminism 175
(Friederike Apelt)



Guns, Doves and Utopia - Cartoons and Posters in West German Nicaragua Solidarity 197 (Christian Helm)





IV. Looking Beyond



The Promise of Internationalism - US Anti-Nuclear Activism and the European Challenge 225 (Kyle Harvey)



An "Other American" - Petra Kelly and the Power of Green Politics in the United States 245 (Stephen Milder)



The Transatlantic Drift and the Reinvention of Europe - West German Labor Unions' Perception of America 267 (Jasper M. Trautsch)

Dissociation and Cooperation - Willy Brandt, the United States and the New Social Movements 293 (Judith Michel)



Victory over American Imperialism? The "Heroine of Socialism" Angela Davis in East Berlin 311 (Kristina Kütt)



The Blazing Continent - Latin American Folklore and Romanticism in the Soviet Union 333 (Tobias Rupprecht)



Notes on Contributors 355
Ob »Sonne statt Reagan« auf der Friedensdemo oder Che-Guevara-Poster und Kaffee aus dem revolutionären Nicaragua in der WG-Küche - die Protestkulturen im Westeuropa der 1980er Jahre speisten sich zu einem Großteil aus der spannungsreichen Auseinandersetzung mit Amerika. Die von ihnen betriebene Sinnstiftung ist also ohne die Bezüge und Referenzen, die Wechselwirkungen und Verflechtungen im »transatlantischen Dreieck« zwischen den beiden Teilen des amerikanischen Kontinents und Europa nicht zu verstehen.
Editiert von: Jan Hansen, Christian Helm, Frank Reichherzer
Jan Hansen ist wiss. Mitarbeiter an der HU Berlin. Christian Helm ist wiss. Mitarbeiter an der Universität Hannover. Frank Reichherzer ist wiss. Mitarbeiter am ZMSBw in Potsdam.
Acknowledgements

The editors would like to express their gratitude to a number of individuals, groups and institutions that contributed and helped in producing this edited volume, which is the result of a workshop held at Humboldt University Berlin in May 2013. First, this conference would not have been possible without the support of Fritz Thyssen Stiftung and the Special Research Unit 640 "Representations of Changing Social Orders". Furthermore, Fritz Thyssen Stiftung approved a generous grant to cover the costs of publication. We are also grateful to Jörg Baberowski, Stefan Rinke and Michael Wildt for their acceptance to include this volume into "Eigene und Fremde Welten". Likewise, we are deeply indebted to Jürgen Hotz, Eva Janetzko and Cornelia Stratthaus of Campus Publishing for their manifold advice and commitment to this edition. Lisa Esser, Kevin Lenk and Julian Nazaruk have offered inestimable support during the editing process.

Jan Hansen, Christian Helm, Frank Reichherzer

August 2015

I. Foundations

Transatlantic Flows and Complex Entanglements of Protest in the 1980s.

An Introduction

Jan Hansen, Christian Helm, Frank Reichherzer

It is 1982. David Horsey, a Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist, sketches a world map which he believes will irritate those who look at it. "The World According to Ronald Reagan" is the title of this illustration finally published in the daily newspaper Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Most strikingly, the drawing is not in due proportion to other maps. Basically, it rescales the prevalent view on geography. This may be read as an under-mining of all presumptions about how the world supposedly works. But what can we see when we look at it? First of all, we learn that the world consists of two major countries, namely the United States of America and the Soviet Union, represented by a cowboy figure with the hand on the trigger and a bear-like man with an Ushanka, a Russian-style ear-hat. The cowboy has the face of Ronald Reagan, the then Republican US president, while the bear stands for Leonid Brezhnev, the secretary general of the Soviet Union's communist party. The map further shows the US itself divided into two rivalling parts. On the one hand, there is a giant California with celebrated landmarks such as "Bechtel Corporation", "Hollywood" and "Disneyland", on the other hand there is a remarkably small region called "Democrats and Welfare Bums" on the territory of, roughly, New England. North of the United States the drawing shows "Unexplored Wasteland", south of the country only "Banana Land", disproportionally huge Falkland islands and Cuba as a "Soviet Colony". Europe, quite paradoxically, is almost non-existent, despite Great Britain being "Thatcher-Land". The rest of West Europe is a region of "Socialists and Pacifists" who are opposed to the missiles deployed in this region. While the map describes these missiles as "ours", the USSR has "theirs" just beyond the Iron Curtain - the overall balance is five to six to the disadvantage of the West. At the same time, the African continent, inhabited by "Negroes", seems to be very irrelevant. Twice as big appear the Arab world ("Our Oil") and the state of Israel. The "Palestinian Homeland" is situated somewhere near the North Pole. From an American point of view, however, the biggest enemy stands heavily armed behind the Iron Curtain. His land is almost as huge as the US. Obviously, there is no need to explain how threatening the Russians are. One can read "Godless Communists, Liars and Spies" as the curt portrayal of the red menace.

What then does this map say? "The World according to Ronald Reagan" depicts a binary outlook on international affairs in the early 1980s. It localizes everything that has to be seen as good and worth striving for within the United States and its Republican milieu while similarly demonizing the Soviet Union. Us and

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Autor: Jan Hansen
ISBN-13 :: 9783593504803
ISBN: 3593504804
Erscheinungsjahr: 01.11.2015
Verlag: Campus Verlag GmbH
Gewicht: 443g
Seiten: 357
Sprache: Deutsch
Sonstiges: Taschenbuch, 213x144x25 mm, 14 Abbildungen
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