Brain Evolution

 Buch
Besorgungstitel  |
 Lieferzeit: 3-5 Tage  
123,22 €

Alle Preise inkl. MwSt.
| zzgl. Versand
 
Detailed high level book delves deeper than introductory texts
Brings together different species to show brain evolution in the large scale
Explains 'rules' of brain behaviour between structure and function
Shows brain development from simple organism to modern day man
Author's research credentials make this text suitable for current researchers
PART 1: EVOLUTIONARY NEUROSCIENCE: THIS BOOK'S SCOPE AND AMBITION
The Book's Scope and Major Themes
PART 2: A HISTORYOF COMPARATIVE NEUROBIOLOGY
The Birth of Comparative Neuroanatomy
Darwin's Time: The Owen-Huxley Debate
The Era of Comparative Cytoarchitectonics
Comparative Hodology and Histochemistry
The Rise of Neurocladistics
The Rejuvenation of Comparative Neuroembryology
Conclusions
PART 3: CONSERVATION IN VERTEBRATE BRAINS
A "Who's Who" of Vertebrates
Comparing Adult Brains
Adult Brain Regions
Adult Cell Types
Neuron-typical Molecules
Comparing Embryonic Brains
The Neuromeric Model
Criticisms of the Neuromeric Model
Mapping Embryos onto Adults
Conclusion
PART 4: EVOLUTIONARY CHANGES IN OVERALL BRAIN SIZE
Changes in Relative Brain Size
Mechanisms of Brain-body Scaling
Functional Correlates of Relative Brain Size
Changes in Absolute Brain Size
Constraints and Compromises
Conclusions
PART 5: EVOLUTIONARY CHANGES IN BRAIN REGION SIZE
Concerted versus Mosaic Evolution
Concerted Evolution
Mosaic Evolution
Toward a Synthesis
Functional Correlates of Brain Region Size
The Principle of Proper Mass
Absolute Size and Functional Capacity
Proportional Size and Influence
Relative Size and Adaptation
Synthesis: The Avian Hippocampus
Conclusions
PART 6: EVOLUTIONARY CHANGES IN BRAIN REGION STRUCTURE
Homology and Novelty
Phylogenetic Conversion: Lamination
Phylogenetic Proliferation: Segregation
Phylogenetic Proliferation: Addition
Conclusions
PART 7: EVOLUTION OF NEURONAL CONNECTIVITY
Epigenetic Population Matching and Cascades
The Parcellation Hypothesis
Connectional Invasion and Its Consequences
General Principles of Network Design
Synthesis and Conclusions
PART 8: WHAT'S SPECIAL ABOUT MAMMAL BRAINS?
Early Mammals and their Brains
The Phylogenetic History of Neocortex
Beyond the Neocortex
Conclusion
PART 9: WHAT'S SPECIAL ABOUT HUMAN BRAINS?
Primate Behavior and Overall Brain Size
Evolutionary Changes in Primate Brain Organization
Hominin Behavior and Overall Brain Size
Evolutionary Changes in Hominin Brain Organization
Conclusions
PART 10: WHAT'S SPECIAL ABOUT HUMAN BRAINS?
Explanatory Strategies in Evolutionary Neuroscience
Steps Toward Synthesis
Absolute and Relative Brain Size
Conclusion
Brain Evolution is a complex weave of species similarities and differences, bound by diverse rules or principles. This book is a detailed examination of these principles, using data from a wide array of vertebrates but minimizing technical details and terminology. It is written for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and more senior scientists who already know something about 'the brain,' but want a deeper understanding of how diverse brains evolved.
The book opens with a brief history of evolutionary neuroscience, then introduces the various groups of vertebrates and their major brain regions. The core of the text explores: what aspects of brain organization are conserved across the vertebrates; how brains and bodies changed in size as vertebrates evolved; how individual brain regions tend to increase or decrease in size; how regions can become structurally more (or less) complex; and how neuronal circuitry evolves. A central theme emerges from these chapters-that evolutionary changes in brain size tend to correlate with many other aspects of brain structure and function, including the proportional size of individual brain regions, their complexity, and their neuronal connections. To explain these correlations, the book delves into rules of brain development and asks how changes in brain structure impact function and behaviour. The final two chapters demonstrate the application of these rules, focusing on how mammal brains diverged from other brains and how Homo sapiens evolved a very large and 'special' brain.
Autor: Georg F. Striedter
Georg Striedter is Associate Professor in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at the University of California, Irvine. He received his undergraduate training at Cornell University and obtained a Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego in 1990. Most of his early research focused on the evolution of various functionally interesting pathways in fish brains. He then went on to study avian brains as a postdoctoral researcher at theCalifornia Institute of Technology. Specifically, he studied how and why parrot brains are specialized for imitating sounds. Dr. Striedter continued this work as a faculty member at UC Irvine and broadened it to include questions about how avian brains differ from those of other vertebrates in terms of structure,
function and development. In 1998, he received the C. J. Herrick Award for his contributions to comparative neuroanatomy.

Zu diesem Artikel ist noch keine Rezension vorhanden.
Helfen sie anderen Besuchern und verfassen Sie selbst eine Rezension.

 

Rezensionen

Autor: Georg F. Striedter
ISBN-13 :: 9780878938209
ISBN: 0878938206
Erscheinungsjahr: 05.10.2004
Verlag: Oxford University Press Inc
Gewicht: 998g
Seiten: 350
Sprache: Englisch
Sonstiges: Buch, 243x186x32 mm, 350 p.
Google Plus
Powered by Inooga